From Tires to Fine Dining by Andrea Schmid

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How did the world's leading tire manufacturer become (arguably) the the most recognizable restaurant guide ever? Well, when thinking about automobile parts, a direct association to the best restaurants across the globe isn't quite what comes to mind, yet Michelin managed to completely flip that convention on its head.

At the turn of the 20th century, cars were but a novelty in France, with just over 2,000 vehicles in circulation nationwide. Enter the Michelin brothers, Édouard and André, who, in 1889 ran a rubber factory in Clermont-Ferrand. On one fateful day, a cyclist who happened to be in the area, rolled in for a replacement tire, where the brothers gladly obliged. Despite failing after a few hundred feet, the Michelins were optimistic about their version, continually improving on the design and became incorporated in 1891 with the first patent for a removable rubber bicycle tire. Pretty cool, yes, but you’re most likely asking how that ties into the culinary industry.

After the brother’s initial foray in bicycles, automobile tires were the next logical step and what better way to advertise them than with the promise of exciting travel and adventure? They figured that the more people travelled, the more their tires would wear out, leading to more sales from replacements by, yes, you guessed it, Michelin! To promote this notion, the brothers created the precursor of The Michelin Guide we know today, including (but no limited to) an extensive list of restaurants, sights and hotels.

The guide was absolutely free for over 15 years but soon the brothers soon began to feel that the public was taking their popular service for granted. As a result, the Michelins started to charge for the curated guide, which, in turn resulted in less of them in circulation, increasing the value of every print. This scarcity naturally created demand, which cemented the Michelin Guide as one of the forefathers of modern restaurant reviewing, situating an institution.

From burning rubber to burning calories, the Michelin Brothers helped change the hospitality industry from one of the most unlikely origins.


Written and Edited by: Alassane Soumare / Social Media Manager

Reviewing Gilberto Manchego Cheese with Truffles by Andrea Schmid

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Raise your hand if you are a Cheese Lover! *Raises hand* If you are like us, you are always excited to discover a new cheese to add to your rotation. Considering it’s the holiday season, a nice and unique cheese might come in handy when hosting guests at home or when wanting to treat a foodie on your gift list.

We love ceasing any opportunity we have to sample a new cheese and Gilberto Manchego Cheese with Truffles was discovered during a run to the local liquor store for some wine. They have a decent cheese section and frequently offer sampling events and we happen to stumble upon one, but we digress…

Gilberto Manchego Cheese with Truffles is a semi-hard cheese perfect to grate or slice. It’s made with non-pasteurized sheep’s milk, thus remaining a raw milk cheese. The truffle flavor is beautiful on the palate and it doesn’t really need to be dressed up with any other additions. A butter cracker with a slice of this cheese is all you need for an enjoyable and truffle-infused cheese plate. Go crazy and add it to your next grilled cheese, too, and let us know how you liked it. Happy holidays!


Written and Edited By: Carla Ortiz, Social Media Coordinator